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collective nouns
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© Daniel Reisel



























 

 
January 12, 2002  

Main Entry: am.a.teur
Pronunciation: 'a-m&-(")t&r, -"tur, -"tyur, -"chur, -ch&r
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from Latin amator lover, from amare to love
Date: 1784

Main Entry: 2maroon
Function: transitive verb
Date: circa 1709
1 : to put ashore on a desolate island or coast and leave to one's fate
2 : to place or leave in isolation or without hope of ready escape

February 23, 2002

Main Entry: eu.pho.ni.ous
Pronunciation: yu-'fO-nE-&s
Function: adjective
Date: 1774
: pleasing to the ear
- eu.pho.ni.ous.ly adverb
- eu.pho.ni.ous.ness noun

March 25, 2002

Main Entry: jet.sam
Pronunciation: 'jet-s&m
Function: noun
Etymology: alteration of jettison
Date: 1570
1 : the part of a ship, its equipment, or its cargo that is cast overboard to lighten the load in time of distress and that sinks or is washed ashore
2 : FLOTSAM 2

Main Entry: flot.sam
Pronunciation: 'flät-s&m
Function: noun
Etymology: Anglo-French floteson, from Old French floter to float, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English flotian to float, flota ship
Date: circa 1607
1 : floating wreckage of a ship or its cargo; broadly : floating debris
2 a : a floating population (as of emigrants or castaways) b : an accumulation of miscellaneous or unimportant stuff

Main Entry: span.drel
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English spandrell, from Anglo-French spaundre, from Old French espandre to spread out -- more at SPAWN
Date: 15th century
Variant(s): also span.dril /'span-dr&l/
1 : the sometimes ornamented space between the right or left exterior curve of an arch and an enclosing right angle
2 : the triangular space beneath the string of a stair

To use the much-discussed term introduced by Gould and Lewontin, perhaps many organic characteristics (they instance the human are "spandrels," leftover flotsam and jetsam of the evolutionary process, just as the spaces at the tops of columns in medieval cathedrals are leftover remnants of the building process.

Gould has expiated the insecurities he obviously feels about his standing as a real professional biologist....

March 17, 2002

Main Entry: smarmy
Pronunciation: 'smär-mE
Function: adjective
Etymology: smarm to gush, slobber
Date: 1924
1 : revealing or marked by a smug, ingratiating, or false earnestness
2 : of low sleazy taste or quality
- smarm.i.ly /-m&-lE/ adverb
- smarm.i.ness /-mE-n&s/ noun

Main Entry: ac.o.lyte
Pronunciation: 'a-k&-"lIt
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French, from Medieval Latin acoluthus, from Middle Greek akolouthos, from Greek, adjective, following, from a-, ha- together (akin to Greek homos same) + keleuthos path
Date: 14th century
1 : one who assists the clergyman in a liturgical service by performing minor duties
2 : one who attends or assists : FOLLOWER

March 13, 2002

to walk to canossa:
For 300 years German kings were able to retain control of upper and central Italy. With Henry III (1039-1056) the German kingship and emperorship reached the zenith of its power, maintaining above all a supremacy over the Papacy. Henry IV (1056-1106) had a quarrel with Pope Gregory VII over whether bishops and other influential church officials should be appointed by the Pope or the temporal ruler. Initially, he was successful. But Gregory retaliated by excommunicating Henry, who thereupon surrendered his authority over the church by doing penance to the Pope at Canossa (1077), an irretrievable loss of power over the church by the emperorship.

Main Entry: sallow
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English salowe, from Old English salu; akin to Old High German salo murky, Russian solovyi yellowish gray
Date: before 12th century
: of a grayish greenish yellow color
- sal.low.ish /'sa-l&-wish/ adjective
- sal.low.ness /'sa-lO-n&s, -l&-/ noun

behind that scatty, countrywoman facade is a steeltrap mind..

March 11, 2002

Main Entry: 1tryst
Pronunciation: 'trist, esp British 'trIst
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French triste watch post, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse traust trust
Date: 14th century
1 : an agreement (as between lovers) to meet
2 : an appointed meeting or meeting place

March 7, 2002

Main Entry: chrys.a.lis
Pronunciation: 'kri-s&-l&s
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin chrysallid-, chrysallis gold-colored pupa of butterflies, from Greek, from chrysos gold, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew hArus gold
Date: 1601
Inflected Form(s): plural chry.sal.i.des /kri-'sa-l&-"dEz/; or chrys.a.lis.es
1 : a pupa of a butterfly; broadly : an insect pupa
2 : a protecting covering : a sheltered state or stage of being or growth

March 6, 2002

Main Entry: Cas.san.dra
Pronunciation: k&-'san-dr&, -'sän-
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin, from Greek Kassandra
1 : a daughter of Priam endowed with the gift of prophecy but fated never to be believed
2 : one that predicts misfortune or disaster

a Canute-like attempt to hold back the flooding tide (King Canute of England (and Norway) was told he was so powerful he could hold back the tide. He couldn't.)
Main Entry: Ca.nute
Pronunciation: k&-'nüt, -'nyüt
Function: biographical name
died 1035 the Great king of England (1016-35); of Denmark (1018-35); of Norway (1028-35); subject of many legends

March 2, 2002

brilliant and oddly beloved misanthrope...fearsomely focussed and a little disoriented...Hunts like this are the X-Games of cryptology: half wordplay and half extreme sport...seem more interested in absurdist humor and elaborate effects than in pure deductive logic...her round, guileless face...a memory that stretches, flawlessly, from Harry Truman to "The Truman Show." ...he brought the same knuckle-rapping rigor to editing puzzles...ensconced...barricaded..."I'm the guy that inspired the phrase 'Doesn't play well with others,' " he says....Then again, ...A light rain is falling on the East Side, glazing its abandoned streets in silver. ...The only person who seemed not to be primed for cruciverbalist rapture was Hook. Burkhard Bilger in the New Yorker Feb 2002.

Main Entry: sal.a.ry
Pronunciation: 'sal-rE, 'sa-l&-
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English salarie, from Latin salarium pension, salary, from neuter of salarius of salt, from sal salt -- more at SALT
Date: 13th century
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
: fixed compensation paid regularly for services
- sal.a.ried /-rEd/ adjective

Main Entry: con.ster.na.tion
Pronunciation: "kän(t)-st&r-'nA-sh&n
Function: noun
Etymology: French or Latin; French, from Latin consternation-, consternatio, from consternare to throw into confusion, from com- + -sternare, probably from sternere to spread, strike down -- more at STREW
Date: circa 1611
: amazement or dismay that hinders or throws into confusion

Main Entry: maud.lin
Pronunciation: 'mod-l&n
Function: adjective
Etymology: alteration of Mary Magdalene; from her depiction as a weeping penitent
Date: 1509
1 : drunk enough to be emotionally silly
2 : weakly and effusively sentimental

April 25, 2002

Main Entry: nam.by-pam.by
Pronunciation: "nam-bE-'pam-bE
Function: adjective
Etymology: Namby Pamby, nickname given to Ambrose Philips
Date: 1745
1 : lacking in character or substance : INSIPID
2 : WEAK, INDECISIVE
- namby-pamby noun

Main Entry: vi.tu.per.a.tive
Pronunciation: vI-'tü-p(&-)r&-tiv, -p&-"rA-
Function: adjective
Date: 1727
: uttering or given to censure : containing or characterized by verbal abuse
- vi.tu.per.a.tive.ly adverb

April 15, 2002

Main Entry: apo.gee
Pronunciation: 'a-p&-(")jE
Function: noun
Etymology: French apogee, from New Latin apogaeum, from Greek apogaion, from neuter of apogeios, apogaios far from the earth, from apo- + gE, gaia earth
Date: 1594
1 : the point in the orbit of an object (as a satellite) orbiting the earth that is at the greatest distance from the center of the earth; also : the point farthest from a planet or a satellite (as the moon) reached by an object orbiting it -- compare PERIGEE
2 : the farthest or highest point : CULMINATION
- apo.ge.an /"a-p&-'jE-&n/ adjective
In the annals of war, the conflict in the Middle East has reached a new apogee.

April 12, 2002

Main Entry: ac.o.lyte
Pronunciation: 'a-k&-"lIt
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French, from Medieval Latin acoluthus, from Middle Greek akolouthos, from Greek, adjective, following, from a-, ha- together (akin to Greek homos same) + keleuthos path
Date: 14th century
1 : one who assists the clergyman in a liturgical service by performing minor duties
2 : one who attends or assists : FOLLOWER

Main Entry: ex.pi.ate
Pronunciation: 'ek-spE-"At
Function: verb
Etymology: Latin expiatus, past participle of expiare to atone for, from ex- + piare to atone for, appease, from pius faithful, pious
Date: 1594
Inflected Form(s): -at.ed; -at.ing
transitive senses
1 obsolete : to put an end to
2 a : to extinguish the guilt incurred by b : to make amends for
intransitive senses : to make expiation
- ex.pi.a.ble /'ek-spE-&-b&l/ adjective
- ex.pi.a.tor /-spE-"A-t&r/ noun

Main Entry: tim.o.rous
Pronunciation: 'ti-m&-r&s, 'tim-r&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French timoureus, from Medieval Latin timorosus, from Latin timor fear, from timEre to fear
Date: 15th century
1 : of a timid disposition : FEARFUL
2 : expressing or suggesting timidity
- tim.o.rous.ly adverb
- tim.o.rous.ness noun

Main Entry: tin.der
Pronunciation: 'tin-d&r
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English tynder; akin to Old High German zuntra tinder, Old English tendan to kindle
Date: before 12th century
1 : a very flammable substance adaptable for use as kindling
2 : something that serves to incite or inflame

Main Entry: 1gage
Pronunciation: 'gAj
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wetti pledge -- more at WED
Date: 14th century
1 : a token of defiance; specifically : a glove or cap cast on the ground to be taken up by an opponent as a pledge of combat
2 : something deposited as a pledge of performance

...this is a gage thrown down before the Israeli leader.

April 4, 2002

Main Entry: buc.ca.neer
Pronunciation: "b&-k&-'nir
Function: noun
Etymology: French boucanier
Date: circa 1690
1 : any of the freebooters preying on Spanish ships and settlements especially in the West Indies in the 17th century; broadly : PIRATE
2 : an unscrupulous adventurer especially in politics or business
- buccaneer intransitive verb
- buc.ca.neer.ish /-ish/ adjective

Main Entry: ca.dence
Pronunciation: 'kA-d[^&]n(t)s
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old Italian cadenza, from cadere to fall, from Latin -- more at CHANCE
Date: 14th century
1 a : a rhythmic sequence or flow of sounds in language b : the beat, time, or measure of rhythmical motion or activity
2 a : a falling inflection of the voice b : a concluding and usually falling strain; specifically : a musical chord sequence moving to a harmonic close or point of rest and giving the sense of harmonic completion
3 : the modulated and rhythmic recurrence of a sound especially in nature
- ca.denced /-d[^&]n(t)st/ adjective
- ca.den.tial /kA-'den(t)-sh&l/ adjective

May 23, 2002

The emergence of a voracious woman unsentimentally pursuing her own sensual pleasure without recourse to protocol or pleasantry is particularly potent when accompanied by a high IQ.

May 21, 2002

Main Entry: 1suc.cor
Pronunciation: 's&-k&r
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English succur, from earlier sucurs, taken as plural, from Old French sucors, from Medieval Latin succursus, from Latin succurrere to run up, run to help, from sub- up + currere to run -- more at CAR
Date: 13th century
1 : RELIEF; also : AID, HELP
2 : something that furnishes relief

Main Entry: ro.do.mon.tade
Pronunciation: "rä-d&-m&n-'tAd, "rO-, -'täd
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French, from Italian Rodomonte, character in Orlando Innamorato by Matteo M. Boiardo
Date: 1612
1 : a bragging speech
2 : vain boasting or bluster : RANT
- rodomontade adjective

Main Entry: dil.a.to.ry
Pronunciation: 'di-l&-"tOr-E, -"tor-
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin dilatorius, from Latin differre (past participle dilatus) to postpone, differ -- more at DIFFER, TOLERATE
Date: 15th century
1 : tending or intended to cause delay
2 : characterized by procrastination : TARDY
- dil.a.to.ri.ly /"di-l&-'tOr-&-lE, -'tor-/ adverb
- dil.a.to.ri.ness /'di-l&-"tOr-E-n&s, -"tor-/ noun

May 18, 2002

metastasizing

Main Entry: me.tas.ta.sis
Pronunciation: m&-'tas-t&-s&s
Function: noun
Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, transition, from Greek, from methistanai to change, from meta- + histanai to set -- more at STAND
Date: 1663
Inflected Form(s): plural me.tas.ta.ses /-"sEz/
: change of position, state, or form: as a : transfer of a disease-producing agency from the site of disease to another part of the body b : a secondary metastatic growth of a malignant tumor
- met.a.stat.ic /"me-t&-'sta-tik/ adjective
- met.a.stat.i.cal.ly /-ti-k(&-)lE/ adverb

On this brilliantly sunny afternoon, such horrors seem in abeyance.

May 17, 2002

stick that in your pipe and smoke it (take it or leave it)

skeeming and skullduggery

Main Entry: skul.dug.gery
Function: noun
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: 1867
Variant(s): or skull.dug.gery /"sk&l-'d&-g(&-)rE, 'sk&l-"/
Inflected Form(s): plural -ger.ies
: a devious device or trick; also : underhanded or unscrupulous behavior

May 16, 2002

Main Entry: un.can.ny
Pronunciation: -'ka-nE
Function: adjective
Date: 1843
1 a : seeming to have a supernatural character or origin : EERIE, MYSTERIOUS b : being beyond what is normal or expected : suggesting superhuman or supernatural powers
2 chiefly Scottish : SEVERE, PUNISHING
synonym see WEIRD
- un.can.ni.ly /-'ka-n[^&]l-E/ adverb
- un.can.ni.ness /-'ka-nE-n&s/ noun

May 14, 2002

unalloyed | to earn the opprobrium | marshall support | he is on the cusp of a right wing wave |

June 27, 2002

Main Entry: pet.ti.fog.ger
Pronunciation: 'pe-tE-"fo-g&r, -"fä-
Function: noun
Etymology: probably from petty + obsolete English fogger pettifogger
Date: 1576
1 : a lawyer whose methods are petty, underhanded, or disreputable : SHYSTER
2 : one given to quibbling over trifles
- pet.ti.fog.ging /-gi[ng]/ adjective or noun
- pet.ti.fog.gery /-g(&-)rE/ noun

June 26, 2002

a perfect confluence of creativity, technique, and untrammelled testosterone...God seems to have a kindly disposition towards...here are some of the prime culprits...saying that sometimes we tend to get a bit carried away is an understatement in league with...feckless attitude...I still remember with a wince...overweening ambition...telling example...nail-biting exchange...not for the faint-hearted...behind the brave smile and the asinine guff lurks the usual dirge...dark and growling biological urges...charming idiosyncrasy...a residue of alcohol mating practice still encodes our behaviour...any self-respecting club...there is nothing more off-putting than. SW

unhinged...functions like clockwork...a flight of errant, irresponsible fancy...bringing bloodshed and ruin...to boast constitutional arrangements which still elude us. JF

June 12, 2002

it doesn't have a snowball's chance in hell

June 11, 2002

But Arir's self-inflicted death was an augury.

Main Entry: au.gu.ry
Pronunciation: 'o-gy&-rE, -g&-
Function: noun
Date: 14th century
Inflected Form(s): plural -ries
1 : divination from auspices or omens; also : an instance of this
2 : OMEN, PORTENT

June 8, 2002

stars out of whack;
to collar support

June 4, 2002

enfant gâté - spoilt child;
tour d'horizon - overview

July 27, 2002

Main Entry: am.bit
Pronunciation: 'am-b&t
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ambitus, from ambire
Date: 1597
1 : CIRCUIT, COMPASS
2 : the bounds or limits of a place or district
3 : a sphere of action, expression, or influence : SCOPE

Main Entry: avun.cu.lar
Pronunciation: &-'v&[ng]-ky&-l&r
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin avunculus maternal uncle -- more at UNCLE
Date: 1831
1 : of or relating to an uncle
2 : suggestive of an uncle especially in kindliness or geniality
- avun.cu.lar.i.ty /&-"v&[ng]-ky&-'la-r&-tE/ noun
- avun.cu.lar.ly /&-'v&[ng]-ky&-l&r-lE/ adverb

July 24, 2002

The creative legerdemain of Cook, Books, and Hyde seems to have allured federal scrutiny to their accounting agency.

Definition 1: Sleight of hand, deceitful cleverness.

From the Old French phrase "leger de main," comprising leger "light" + de "of" + main "hand."

July 19, 2002

Luis has a slightly gamin, yet almost rakish quality to him, which is a perfect foil for Joby's quieter, slightly more demure smouldering.

Main Entry: gam.in
Pronunciation: 'ga-m&n
Function: noun
Etymology: French
Date: 1840
1 : a boy who hangs around on the streets : URCHIN
2 : GAMINE 2

Main Entry: de.mure
Pronunciation: di-'myur
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English
Date: 14th century
1 : RESERVED, MODEST
2 : affectedly modest, reserved, or serious : COY
- de.mure.ly adverb
- de.mure.ness noun

Main Entry: pu.er.ile
Pronunciation: 'pyu(-&)r-&l, -"Il
Function: adjective
Etymology: French or Latin; French pueril, from Latin puerilis, from puer boy, child; akin to Sanskrit putra son, child and perhaps to Greek pais boy, child -- more at FEW
Date: 1661
1 : JUVENILE
2 : CHILDISH, SILLY
- pu.er.ile.ly /-&(l)-lE, -"Il-lE/ adverb
- pu.er.il.i.ty /"pyu(-&)r-'i-l&-tE/ noun

jejune clichés

Main Entry: je.june
Pronunciation: ji-'jün
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin jejunus empty of food, hungry, meager
Date: 1646
1 : lacking nutritive value
2 : devoid of significance or interest : DULL
3 : JUVENILE, PUERILE
synonym see INSIPID
- je.june.ly adverb
- je.june.ness /-'jUn-n&s/ noun

August 31, 2002

Main Entry: in.vid.i.ous
Pronunciation: in-'vi-dE-&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin invidiosus envious, invidious, from invidia envy -- more at ENVY
Date: 1606
1 : tending to cause discontent, animosity, or envy
2 : ENVIOUS
3 a : of an unpleasant or objectionable nature : OBNOXIOUS b : of a kind to cause harm or resentment
- in.vid.i.ous.ly adverb
- in.vid.i.ous.ness noun

August 30, 2002

Main Entry: eaves.drop
Pronunciation: 'Evz-"dräp
Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: probably back-formation from eavesdropper, literally, one standing under the drip from the eaves
Date: 1606
: to listen secretly to what is said in private
- eaves.drop.per noun

Main Entry: egad
Pronunciation: i-'gad
Function: interjection
Etymology: probably euphemism for oh God
Date: 1673
Variant(s): or egads /-'gadz/
-- used as a mild oath

Main Entry: 1pale
Pronunciation: 'pA(&)l
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French pal stake, from Latin palus -- more at POLE
Date: 12th century
1 archaic : PALISADE, PALING
2 a : one of the stakes of a palisade b : PICKET
3 a : a space or field having bounds : ENCLOSURE b : a territory or district within certain bounds or under a particular jurisdiction
4 : an area or the limits within which one is privileged or protected (as from censure)
5 : a perpendicular stripe on a heraldic shield

britshalom.org

August 27, 2002

Main Entry: 2incendiary
Function: adjective
Date: 15th century
1 : of, relating to, or involving a deliberate burning of property
2 : tending to excite or inflame : INFLAMMATORY
3 a : igniting combustible materials spontaneously b : of, relating to, or being a weapon (as a bomb) designed to start fires

August 25, 2002

Main Entry: 1su.per.nu.mer.ary
Pronunciation: "sü-p&r-'nü-m&-"rer-E, -'nyü-, -m&-rE; -'n(y)üm-rE
Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin supernumerarius, from Latin super- + numerus number
Date: 1605
1 a : exceeding the usual, stated, or prescribed number b : not enumerated among the regular components of a group and especially of a military organization
2 : exceeding what is necessary, required, or desired
3 : more numerous

Main Entry: 2supernumerary
Function: noun
Date: 1639
Inflected Form(s): plural -ar.ies
1 : a supernumerary person or thing
2 : an actor employed to play a walk-on

champion.

appreciate: &-'prE-sE-8

to get on an even keel - to reach a point of balance and stability

Main Entry: sa.lu.bri.ous
Pronunciation: s&-'lü-brE-&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin salubris; akin to salvus safe, healthy -- more at SAFE
Date: 1547
: favorable to or promoting health or well-being
synonym see HEALTHFUL
- sa.lu.bri.ous.ly adverb
- sa.lu.bri.ous.ness noun
- sa.lu.bri.ty /-br&-tE/ noun

Main Entry: jer.e.mi.ad
Pronunciation: "jer-&-'mI-&d, -"ad
Function: noun
Etymology: French jeremiade, from Jeremie Jeremiah, from Late Latin Jeremias
Date: 1780
: a prolonged lamentation or complaint; also : a cautionary or angry harangue

i feel well today (not good). to be good in english is to be "not naughty".

August 20, 2002

Main Entry: be.guile
Pronunciation: bi-'gI(&)l
Function: verb
Date: 13th century
Inflected Form(s): be.guiled; be.guil.ing
transitive senses
1 : to lead by deception
2 : HOODWINK
3 : to while away especially by some agreeable occupation; also : DIVERT 2
4 : to engage the interest of by or as if by guile
intransitive senses : to deceive by wiles
synonym see DECEIVE
- be.guile.ment /-'gI(&)l-m&nt/ noun
- be.guil.er /-'gI-l&r/ noun
- be.guil.ing.ly /-'gI-li[ng]-lE/ adverb

August 19, 2002

Main Entry: unc.tu.ous
Pronunciation: '&[ng](k)-ch&-w&s, -ch&s, -shw&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French unctueux, from Medieval Latin unctuosus, from Latin unctus act of anointing, from unguere to anoint
Date: 14th century
1 a : FATTY, OILY b : smooth and greasy in texture or appearance
2 : PLASTIC
3 : full of unction; especially : revealing or marked by a smug, ingratiating, and false earnestness or spirituality
- unc.tu.ous.ly adverb
- unc.tu.ous.ness noun

Main Entry: in.sou.ci.ance
Pronunciation: in-'sü-sE-&n(t)s, a[^n]-süs-yä[^n]s
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from in- + soucier to trouble, disturb, from Latin sollicitare -- more at SOLICIT
Date: 1799
: lighthearted unconcern : NONCHALANCE
- in.sou.ci.ant /in-'sU-sE-&nt, a[^n]-sUs-y@[^n]/ adjective
- in.sou.ci.ant.ly /in-'sU-sE-&nt-lE/ adverb

Main Entry: non.fea.sance
Pronunciation: 'nän-'fE-z[^&]n(t)s
Function: noun
Etymology: non- + obsolete English feasance doing, execution
Date: 1596
: failure to act; especially : failure to do what ought to be done

August 10, 2002

feint and parry

Main Entry: 1feint
Pronunciation: 'fAnt
Function: noun
Etymology: French feinte, from Old French, from feint, past participle of feindre
Date: 1679
: something feigned; specifically : a mock blow or attack on or toward one part in order to distract attention from the point one really intends to attack
synonym see TRICK

Main Entry: par.ry
Pronunciation: 'par-E
Function: verb
Etymology: probably from French parez, imperative of parer to parry, from Old Provencal parar, from Latin parare to prepare -- more at PARE
Date: 1672
Inflected Form(s): par.ried; par.ry.ing
intransitive senses
1 : to ward off a weapon or blow
2 : to evade or turn aside something
transitive senses
1 : to ward off (as a blow)
2 : to evade especially by an adroit answer
- parry noun

August 9, 2002

Main Entry: ar.got
Pronunciation: 'är-g&t, -(")gO
Function: noun
Etymology: French
Date: 1860
: an often more or less secret vocabulary and idiom peculiar to a particular group

Main Entry: askance
Pronunciation: &-'skan(t)s
Function: adverb
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: circa 1530
Variant(s): also askant /-'skant/
1 : with a side-glance : OBLIQUELY
2 : with disapproval or distrust : SCORNFULLY

english pronounciation: aa' -skans

August 8, 2002

Main Entry: 1pan.der
Pronunciation: 'pan-d&r
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English Pandare Pandarus, from Latin Pandarus
Date: 1530
1 a : a go-between in love intrigues b : PIMP
2 : someone who caters to or exploits the weaknesses of others

August 4, 2002

Main Entry: Scous.er
Pronunciation: 'skau-s&r
Function: noun
Date: 1959
: a native or inhabitant of Liverpool, England

August 3, 2002

Main Entry: mawk.ish
Pronunciation: 'mo-kish
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English mawke maggot, from Old Norse mathkr -- more at MAGGOT
Date: circa 1697
1 : having an insipid often unpleasant taste
2 : sickly or puerilely sentimental
- mawk.ish.ly adverb
- mawk.ish.ness noun

this was a smart bomb nonpareil

Main Entry: 1non.pa.reil
Pronunciation: "nän-p&-'rel
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English nonparaille, from Middle French nonpareil, from non- + pareil equal, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin pariculus, from Latin par equal
Date: 15th century
: having no equal

September 21, 2002

Main Entry: so.bri.quet
Pronunciation: 'sO-bri-"kA, -"ket, "sO-bri-'
Function: noun
Etymology: French
Date: 1646
: a descriptive name or epithet : NICKNAME

 

bingo-wings: n. the excess of skin often found on the underarms of elderly people.

 

Main Entry: fo.gy
Function: noun
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: 1780
Variant(s): also fo.gey /'fO-gE/
Inflected Form(s): plural fogies also fogeys
: a person with old-fashioned ideas -- usually used with old
- fo.gy.ish /-gE-ish/ adjective
- fo.gy.ism /-gE-"i-z&m/ noun

Main Entry: list.less
Pronunciation: 'list-l&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle English listles, from [^2]list
Date: 15th century
: characterized by lack of interest, energy, or spirit : LANGUID
- list.less.ly adverb
- list.less.ness noun

Main Entry: 1girth
Pronunciation: 'g&rth
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse gjorth; akin to Old English gyrdan to gird
Date: 13th century
1 : a band or strap that encircles the body of an animal to fasten something (as a saddle) on its back
2 a : a measure around a body b : SIZE, DIMENSIONS

Main Entry: sa.lu.bri.ous
Pronunciation: s&-'lü-brE-&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin salubris; akin to salvus safe, healthy -- more at SAFE
Date: 1547
: favorable to or promoting health or well-being
synonym see HEALTHFUL
- sa.lu.bri.ous.ly adverb
- sa.lu.bri.ous.ness noun
- sa.lu.bri.ty /-br&-tE/ noun

September 19, 2002

Main Entry: knack.er
Pronunciation: 'na-k&r
Function: noun
Etymology: probably from English dialect, saddlemaker
Date: 1812
1 British : a buyer of worn-out domestic animals or their carcasses for use especially as animal food or fertilizer
2 British : a buyer of old structures for their constituent materials

Main Entry: knack
Pronunciation: 'nak
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English knak
Date: 14th century
1 a : a clever trick or stratagem b : a clever way of doing something
2 : a special ready capacity that is hard to analyze or teach
3 archaic : an ingenious device; broadly : TOY, KNICKKNACK
synonym see GIFT

September 18, 2002

Main Entry: blot.to
Pronunciation: 'blä-(")tO
Function: adjective
Etymology: probably irregular from [^2]blot
Date: 1917
: DRUNK 1a

Main Entry: pu.er.ile
Pronunciation: 'pyu(-&)r-&l, -"Il
Function: adjective
Etymology: French or Latin; French pueril, from Latin puerilis, from puer boy, child; akin to Sanskrit putra son, child and perhaps to Greek pais boy, child -- more at FEW
Date: 1661
1 : JUVENILE
2 : CHILDISH, SILLY
- pu.er.ile.ly /-&(l)-lE, -"Il-lE/ adverb
- pu.er.il.i.ty /"pyu(-&)r-'i-l&-tE/ noun

Main Entry: um.brage
Pronunciation: '&m-brij
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin umbraticum, neuter of umbraticus of shade, from umbratus, past participle of umbrare to shade, from umbra shade, shadow; akin to Lithuanian unksme shadow
Date: 15th century
1 : SHADE, SHADOW
2 : shady branches : FOLIAGE
3 a : an indistinct indication : vague suggestion : HINT b : a reason for doubt : SUSPICION
4 : a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult
synonym see OFFENSE

September 17, 2002

Main Entry: 2muf.ti
Pronunciation: 'm&f-tE
Function: noun
Etymology: probably from [^1]mufti
Date: 1816
: ordinary dress as distinguished from that denoting an occupation or
station ; especially : civilian clothes when worn by a person in the armed
forces

Main Entry: im.per.il
Pronunciation: im-'per-&l
Function: transitive verb
Date: 15th century
Inflected Form(s): -iled or -illed; -il.ing or -il.ling
: to bring into peril : ENDANGER
- im.per.il.ment /-m&nt/ noun

piyutim comes from the same word as the Greek poetry

Main Entry: imp.ish
Pronunciation: 'im-pish
Function: adjective
Date: 1652
: of, relating to, or befitting an imp; especially : MISCHIEVOUS
- imp.ish.ly adverb
- imp.ish.ness noun

Main Entry: 1imp
Pronunciation: 'imp
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English impe, from Old English impa, from impian to imp
Date: before 12th century
1 obsolete : SHOOT, BUD; also : GRAFT
2 a : a small demon : FIEND b : a mischievous child : URCHIN

September 15, 2002

Main Entry: quiff
Pronunciation: 'kwif
Function: noun
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: circa 1890
British : a prominent forelock

 

Main Entry: brack.ish
Pronunciation: 'bra-kish
Function: adjective
Etymology: Dutch brac salty; akin to Middle Low German brac salty
Date: 1538
1 : somewhat salty
2 a : not appealing to the taste b : REPULSIVE
- brack.ish.ness noun

September 13, 2002

Main Entry: monkey wrench
Function: noun
Date: circa 1858
1 : a wrench with one fixed and one adjustable jaw at right angles to a straight handle
2 : something that disrupts

American: adjustable spanner

September 10, 2002

Guardian Style Guide

September 6, 2002

Main Entry: en.co.mi.um
Pronunciation: en-'kO-mE-&m
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin, from Greek enkOmion, from en in + kOmos revel, celebration
Date: 1589
Inflected Form(s): plural -mi.ums or en.co.mia /-mE-&/
: glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise; also : an expression of this
synonyms ENCOMIUM, EULOGY, PANEGYRIC, TRIBUTE, CITATION mean a formal expression of praise. ENCOMIUM implies enthusiasm and warmth in praising a person or a thing. EULOGY applies to a prepared speech or writing extolling the virtues and services of a person. PANEGYRIC suggests an elaborate often poetic compliment. TRIBUTE implies deeply felt praise conveyed either through words or through a significant act. CITATION applies to the formal praise accompanying the mention of a person in a military dispatch or in awarding an honorary degree.

September 5, 2002   

Main Entry: 1pil.lion
Pronunciation: 'pil-y&n
Function: noun
Etymology: ScGaelic or Irish; Scottish Gaelic pillean, diminutive of peall covering, couch; Irish pillin, diminutive of peall covering, couch
Date: 1503
1 a : a light saddle for women consisting chiefly of a cushion b : a pad or cushion put on behind a man's saddle chiefly for a woman to ride on
2 chiefly British : a motorcycle or bicycle saddle for a passenger

September 3, 2002

Main Entry: puk.ka
Pronunciation: 'p&-k&
Function: adjective
Etymology: Hindi pakkA cooked, ripe, solid, from Sanskrit pakva; akin to Greek pessein to cook -- more at COOK
Date: 1698
: GENUINE, AUTHENTIC; also : FIRST-CLASS

September 2, 2002

Main Entry: 1jinx
Pronunciation: 'ji[ng](k)s
Function: noun
Etymology: perhaps alteration of jynx wryneck; from the use of wrynecks in witchcraft
Date: 1911
: one that brings bad luck; also : the state or spell of bad luck brought on by a jinx

no skin of your back then

they have you by the proverbials

October 30, 2002

Main Entry: 2die
Pronunciation: 'dI
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English dee, from Middle French de
Date: 14th century
Inflected Form(s): plural dice /'dIs/; or dies /'dIz/
1 plural dice : a small cube marked on each face with from one to six spots and used usually in pairs in various games and in gambling by being shaken and thrown to come to rest at random on a flat surface -- often used figuratively in expressions concerning chance or the irrevocability of a course of action

October 29, 2002

to do your level best

Main Entry: Dutch courage
Function: noun
Date: 1809
: courage artificially stimulated especially by drink; also : drink taken for courage

not a cat in hell's chance

October 28, 2002

Main Entry: das.tard.ly
Pronunciation: -lE
Function: adjective
Date: 1542
1 : COWARDLY
2 : characterized by underhandedness or treachery
synonym see COWARDLY
- das.tard.li.ness noun

October 25, 2002

as thick as thieves

October 23, 2002

Main Entry: pro.te.an
Pronunciation: 'prO-tE-&n, prO-'tE-
Function: adjective
Date: 1598
1 : of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume different forms
2 : displaying great diversity or variety : VERSATILE

Main Entry: sou.bri.quet
Pronunciation: 'sO-bri-"kA, -"ket, "sO-bri-'
Function: noun
Etymology: French
Date: 1646
: a descriptive name or epithet : NICKNAME

October 21, 2002

stick this in your pipe and smoke it

wholesale finger-pointing and buck-passing makes the future for all concerned looks bleaker

Main Entry: yar.mul.ke
Function: noun
Etymology: Yiddish yarmlke, from Polish jarmulka & Ukrainian yarmulka skullcap, of Turkic origin; akin to Turkish yagmurluk rainwear
Date: 1903
Variant(s): also yar.mel.ke /'y@-m&-k&, 'y@r-m&(l)-k&/
: a skullcap worn especially by Orthodox and Conservative Jewish males in the synagogue and the home

October 19, 2002

Main Entry: pre.var.i.cate
Pronunciation: pri-'var-&-"kAt
Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: Latin praevaricatus, past participle of praevaricari to act in collusion, literally, to straddle, from prae- + varicare to straddle, from varus bowlegged
Date: circa 1631
Inflected Form(s): -cat.ed; -cat.ing
: to deviate from the truth : EQUIVOCATE
synonym see LIE
- pre.var.i.ca.tion /-"var-&-'kA-sh&n/ noun
- pre.var.i.ca.tor /-'var-&-"kA-t&r/ noun

October 18, 2002

pretty dashed good let me tell you...

Main Entry: pro.te.an
Pronunciation: 'prO-tE-&n, prO-'tE-
Function: adjective
Date: 1598
1 : of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume different forms
2 : displaying great diversity or variety : VERSATILE

Main Entry: car.a.pace
Pronunciation: 'kar-&-"pAs
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from Spanish carapacho
Date: 1836
1 : a bony or chitinous case or shield covering the back or part of the back of an animal (as a turtle or crab)
2 : a protective, decorative, or disguising shell

to develop a carapace of cynicism

October 15, 2002

Main Entry: gas.ket
Pronunciation: 'gas-k&t
Function: noun
Etymology: perhaps modification of French garcette
Date: circa 1889
: a material (as rubber) or a member (as an O-ring) used to make a joint fluid-tight

Main Entry: traipse
Pronunciation: 'trAps
Function: verb
Etymology: origin unknown
Date: 1647
Inflected Form(s): traipsed; traips.ing
intransitive senses : to go on foot : WALK ; also : to walk or travel about without apparent plan but with or without a purpose
transitive senses : TRAMP, WALK
synonym see WANDER
- traipse noun

October 14, 2002

Main Entry: feck.less
Pronunciation: 'fek-l&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Scots, from feck effect, majority, from Middle English (Sc) fek, alteration of Middle English effect
Date: circa 1585
1 : WEAK, INEFFECTIVE
2 : WORTHLESS, IRRESPONSIBLE
- feck.less.ly adverb
- feck.less.ness noun

Main Entry: common-law marriage
Function: noun
Date: 1900
1 : a marriage recognized in some jurisdictions and based on the parties' agreement to consider themselves married and sometimes also on their cohabitation
2 : the cohabitation of a couple even when it does not constitute a legal marriage

October 7, 2002

'det lerretet får vi bleke ved neste korsvei'

Main Entry: pri.a.pic
Pronunciation: prI-'A-pik, -'a-
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin priapus lecher, from Priapus
Date: 1786
1 : PHALLIC
2 : relating to or preoccupied with virility

Main Entry: pro.pin.qui.ty
Pronunciation: pr&-'pi[ng]-kw&-tE
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English propinquite, from Latin propinquitat-, propinquitas kinship, proximity, from propinquus near, akin, from prope near -- more at APPROACH
Date: 14th century
1 : nearness of blood : KINSHIP
2 : nearness in place or time : PROXIMITY

Main Entry: con.tre.temps
Pronunciation: 'kän-tr&-"tä[^n], kO[^n]-tr&-tä[^n]
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from contre- counter- + temps time, from Latin tempus
Date: 1769
Inflected Form(s): plural con.tre.temps /-(")t@[^n](z)/
: an inopportune or embarrassing occurrence or situation

October 2, 2002

Main Entry: 1hec.tor
Pronunciation: 'hek-t&r
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin, from Greek HektOr
1 capitalized : a son of Priam, husband of Andromache, and Trojan champion slain by Achilles
2 : BULLY, BRAGGART

Main Entry: 2hector
Function: verb
Date: 1660
Inflected Form(s): hec.tored; hec.tor.ing /-t(&-)ri[ng]/
intransitive senses : to play the bully : SWAGGER
transitive senses : to intimidate or harass by bluster or personal pressure
synonym see BAIT
- hec.tor.ing.ly /-t(&-)ri[ng]-lE/ adverb

Main Entry: in.tel.li.gent.sia
Pronunciation: in-"te-l&-'jen(t)-sE-&, -'gen(t)-
Function: noun
Etymology: Russian intelligentsiya, from Latin intelligentia intelligence
Date: 1907
: intellectuals who form an artistic, social, or political vanguard or elite

Main Entry: 1bour.geois
Pronunciation: 'burzh-"wä also 'buzh- or 'büzh- or burzh-'
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle French, from Old French borjois, from borc
Date: circa 1565
1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of the townsman or of the social middle class
2 : marked by a concern for material interests and respectability and a tendency toward mediocrity
3 : dominated by commercial and industrial interests : CAPITALISTIC
- bour.geois.ifi.ca.tion /"bu(r)zh-"w@-z&-f&-'kA-sh&n/ noun
- bour.geois.ify /bu(r)zh-'w@-z&-"fI/ verb

Main Entry: 2bourgeois
Function: noun
Date: circa 1674
Inflected Form(s): plural bourgeois /-"w@(z), -'w@(z)/
1 a : BURGHER b : a middle-class person
2 : a person with social behavior and political views held to be influenced by private-property interest : CAPITALIST
3 plural : BOURGEOISIE

Main Entry: pe.tit bourgeois
Pronunciation: p&-'tE-, "pe-tE-
Function: noun
Etymology: French, literally, small bourgeois
Date: 1853
1 : a member of the petite bourgeoisie
2 : PETITE BOURGEOISIE
- petit bourgeois adjective

Main Entry: epa.ter le bour.geois
Pronunciation: A-p[a']-tA-l&-bür-zhw[a']
Etymology: French
Variant(s): or epater les bourgeois /-lA-bUr-/
Usage: foreign term
: to shock the middle classes

Main Entry: chau.vin.ism
Pronunciation: 'shO-v&-"ni-z&m
Function: noun
Etymology: French chauvinisme, from Nicolas Chauvin, character noted for his excessive patriotism and devotion to Napoleon in Theodore and Hippolyte Cogniard's play La Cocarde tricolore (1831)
Date: 1870
1 : excessive or blind patriotism -- compare JINGOISM
2 : undue partiality or attachment to a group or place to which one belongs or has belonged
3 : an attitude of superiority toward members of the opposite sex; also : behavior expressive of such an attitude
- chau.vin.ist /-v&-nist/ noun or adjective
- chau.vin.is.tic /"shO-v&-'nis-tik/ adjective
- chau.vin.is.ti.cal.ly /-ti-k(&-)lE/ adverb

November 15, 2002

vi·tu·per·a·tion
The act or an instance of vituperating; abusive censure.
Sustained, harshly abusive language; invective.

su·per·cil·i·ous
[Latin supercilisus, from supercilium, eyebrow, pride : super-, super- + cilium, lower eyelid; see kel-1 in Indo-European roots.]
Feeling or showing haughty disdain.

November 14, 2002

ris·i·ble
[Late Latin rsibilis, from Latin rsus, past participle of rdre, to laugh.]
adj.
Relating to laughter or used in eliciting laughter.
Eliciting laughter; ludicrous.
Capable of laughing or inclined to laugh.

December 29, 2002

nex·us
Latin, from, past participle of nectere, to bind; see ned- in Indo-European roots.
A means of connection; a link or tie: "this nexus between New York's . . . real-estate investors and its . . . politicians" (Wall Street Journal).
A connected series or group.
The core or center: "The real nexus of the money culture [was] Wall Street" (Bill Barol).

plex·us
(click to hear the word) (plkss)
n. pl. plexus or plex·us·es
A structure in the form of a network, especially of nerves, blood vessels, or lymphatics: the cardiac plexus; the pelvic plexus.
A combination of interlaced parts; a network.

pro·lix
Middle English, from Old French prolixe, from Latin prlixus, poured forth, extended.
Tediously prolonged; wordy: editing a prolix manuscript.
Tending to speak or write at excessive length. See Synonyms at wordy.

December 18, 2002

to give currency to an idea

http://www.britshalom.org/innocence.htm

December 12, 2002

he knows whereof he speaks

milque·toast
One who has a meek, timid, unassertive nature.
After Caspar Milquetoast, a comic-strip character created by Harold Tucker Webster (1885-1952).

December 5, 2002

white elephant
A rare, expensive possession that is a financial burden to maintain.
Something of dubious or limited value.
An article, ornament, or household utensil no longer wanted by its owner.
An endeavor or venture that proves to be a conspicuous failure.
A rare whitish or light-gray form of the Asian elephant, often regarded with special veneration in regions of southeast Asia and India.

December 1, 2002

coy
[Middle English, from Old French quei, coi, quiet, still, from Vulgar Latin *qutus, from Latin quitus, past participle of quiscere, to rest; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]
Tending to avoid people and social situations; reserved.
Affectedly and usually flirtatiously shy or modest. See Synonyms at shy1.
Annoyingly unwilling to make a commitment.

 

Main Entry: He.brew
Pronunciation: 'hE-(")br-
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English Ebreu, from Old French, from Late Latin Hebraeus, from Latin, adjective, from Greek Hebraios, from Aramaic `Ebrai
Date: 13th century
1 a : the Semitic language of the ancient Hebrews b : any of various later forms of this language
2 : a member of or descendant from one of a group of northern Semitic peoples including the Israelites; especially : ISRAELITE
- Hebrew adjective

Main Entry: Ar.ab
Pronunciation: 'ar-&b, 'er-; dial also 'A-"rab
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Arabus, Arabs, from Greek Arab-, Araps
Date: 14th century
1 a : a member of the Semitic people of the Arabian peninsula b : a member of an Arabic-speaking people
2 : ARABIAN HORSE
- Arab adjective

Main Entry: 1va.nil.la
Pronunciation: v&-'ni-l&, -'ne-
Function: noun
Etymology: New Latin, from Spanish vainilla vanilla (plant and fruit), diminutive of vaina sheath, from Latin vagina sheath, vagina
Date: 1662
1 a : VANILLA BEAN b : a commercially important extract of the vanilla bean that is used especially as a flavoring
2 : any of a genus (Vanilla) of tropical American climbing epiphytic orchids

Main Entry: ef.fer.vesce
Pronunciation: "e-f&r-'ves
Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: Latin effervescere, from ex- + fervescere to begin to boil, inchoative of fervEre to boil -- more at BREW
Date: 1784
Inflected Form(s): -vesced; -vesc.ing
1 : to bubble, hiss, and foam as gas escapes
2 : to show liveliness or exhilaration
- ef.fer.ves.cence /-'ve-s[^&]n(t)s/ noun
- ef.fer.ves.cent /-s[^&]nt/ adjective
- ef.fer.ves.cent.ly adverb

Main Entry: in.can.des.cent
Pronunciation: -s[^&]nt
Function: adjective
Etymology: probably from French, from Latin incandescent-, incandescens, present participle of incandescere to become hot, from in- + candescere to become hot, from candEre to glow -- more at CANDID
Date: 1794
1 a : white, glowing, or luminous with intense heat b : strikingly bright, radiant, or clear c : marked by brilliance especially of expression d : characterized by glowing zeal : ARDENT
2 a : of, relating to, or being light produced by incandescence b : producing light by incandescence
- in.can.des.cent.ly adverb

style is the feather in the arrow, not the feather in the cap..

diddlysquat..

under a worst case scenario..

Perhaps the ne plus ultra of this trend occurred when a young member of the British royal family..

Main Entry: fat.u.ous
Pronunciation: 'fa-ch--&s, -ty--
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin fatuus foolish
Date: 1633
: complacently or inanely foolish : SILLY
synonym see SIMPLE
- fat.u.ous.ly adverb
- fat.u.ous.ness noun

crowbar his way in..

Main Entry: re.cru.des.cence
Pronunciation: -'de-s[^&]n(t)s
Function: noun
Date: circa 1721
: a new outbreak after a period of abatement or inactivity : RENEWAL

Main Entry: ex.e.crate
Pronunciation: 'ek-s&-"krAt
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Latin exsecratus, past participle of exsecrari to put under a curse, from ex + sacr-, sacer sacred
Date: 1561
Inflected Form(s): -crat.ed; -crat.ing
1 : to declare to be evil or detestable : DENOUNCE
2 : to detest utterly
- ex.e.cra.tive /-"krA-tiv/ adjective
- ex.e.cra.tor /-"krA-t&r/ noun

asinine (AS-uh-nyn) adjective

1. Utterly stupid or silly.

2. Of, relating to, or resembling an ass.

[Latin asininus, of an ass, from asinus, ass.]

Main Entry: cre.tin
Pronunciation: 'krE-t[^&]n
Function: nounEtymology: French cretin, from French dialect cretin, literally, wretch, innocent victim, from Latin christianus Christian
Date: 17791 : one afflicted with cretinism
2 : a stupid, vulgar, or insensitive person : CLOD, LOUT- cre.tin.ous /-t[^&]n-&s/ adjective

The same message is carried through into...

bemoan

saccharine

conflated with the fact that

was proof of a decline so fundamental that

Julian Barnes's persnickety Oxbridge wit

And to this we must add one further idea.

Not so with xx.

slipshod

Main Entry: ed.i.fy
Pronunciation: 'e-d&-"fI
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French edifier, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin aedificare to instruct or improve spiritually, from Latin, to erect a house, from aedes temple, house; akin to Old English Ad funeral pyre, Latin aestas summer
Date: 14th century
Inflected Form(s): -fied; -fy.ing
1 archaic a : BUILD b : ESTABLISH
2 : to instruct and improve especially in moral and religious knowledge; also : ENLIGHTEN, INFORM

hung, drawn and quartered -
Meaning
A gruesome form of torture and, eventually, death by execution.
Origin
In use at least until Tudor times in the UK. The victim is first hung
by the neck but taken from the scaffold while still alive. The entrails
and genitals are then removed and the torso hacked into four quarters.

Main Entry: 1hal.cy.on
Pronunciation: 'hal-sE-&n
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English alceon, from Latin halcyon, from Greek alkyOn, halkyOn
Date: 14th century
1 : a bird identified with the kingfisher and held in ancient legend to nest at sea about the time of the winter solstice and to calm the waves during incubation
2 : KINGFISHER

Main Entry: for.ni.cate
Pronunciation: 'for-n&-"kAt
Function: verb
Etymology: Late Latin fornicatus, past participle of fornicare to have intercourse with prostitutes, from Latin fornic-, fornix arch, vault, brothel
Date: 1552
Inflected Form(s): -cat.ed; -cat.ing
intransitive senses : to commit fornication
transitive senses : to commit fornication with
- for.ni.ca.tor /-"kA-t&r/ noun

Darwinism: Variation and elimination.

Gushpanka (Aram.) - support, lending validity

I am nailing my collar firmly to the fence (mast).

To ponce around....

hither and yon....

Wasta: influence (Arab.)

kalam fadi-empty talk (Arab.)

A deeply stupid idea....

Iron the crease from my brow

To pile out (from somewhere)

Salt of the earth

Main Entry: cam.eo
Pronunciation: 'ka-mE-"O
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English camew, from Middle French camau, kamaheu
Date: 15th century
Inflected Form(s): plural -eos
a usually brief literary or filmic piece that brings into delicate or sharp relief the character of a person, place, or event
or: a small theatrical role usually performed by a well-known actor and often limited to a single scene; broadly : any brief appearance
- cameo adjective
- cameo transitive verb

Main Entry: co.lo.nial.ism
Pronunciation: k&-'lO-nE-&-"li-z&m, -ny&-"li-
Function: noun
Date: 1853
Middle English colonie, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin colonia, from colonus farmer, colonist, from colere to cultivate
1 : the quality or state of being colonial
2 : something characteristic of a colony
3 a : control by one power over a dependent area or people b : a policy advocating or based on such control
- co.lo.nial.ist /-list/ noun or adjective
- co.lo.nial.is.tic /-"lO-nE-&-'lis-tik, -ny&-'lis-/ adjective

Pyrrhus, king of Epirus who sustained heavy losses in defeating the Romans 3rd C BC.

Main Entry: ex.co.ri.ate
Pronunciation: ek-'skOr-E-"At, -'skor-
Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin excoriatus, past participle of excoriare, from Latin ex- + corium skin, hide -- more at CUIRASS
Date: 15th century
Inflected Form(s): -at.ed; -at.ing
1 : to wear off the skin of : ABRADE
2 : to censure scathingly
- ex.co.ri.a.tion /(")ek-"skOr-E-'A-sh&n, -"skor-/ noun

Caveat Emptor: from the Latin and liberally translated: let the buyer be ware; The rule of law warning potential purchasers of goods.

Main Entry: au.to-da-fe
Pronunciation: "au-tO-d&-'fA, "o-tO-
Function: noun
Etymology: Portuguese auto da fe, literally, act of the faith
Date: 1723
Inflected Form(s): plural au.tos-da-fe /-tOz-d&-/
: the ceremony accompanying the pronouncement of judgment by the Inquisition and followed by the execution of sentence by the secular authorities; broadly : the burning of a heretic

Main Entry: aper.cu
Pronunciation: [a']-per-s[-E], "a-p&r-'s-
Function: noun
Etymology: French, from apercu, past participle of apercevoir to perceive, from Old French aperceivre, from a- (from Latin ad-) + perceivre to perceive -- more at PERCEIVE
Date: 1828
Inflected Form(s): plural apercus /-s[UE](z), -'sUz/
1 : a brief survey or sketch : OUTLINE
2 : an immediate impression; especially : INSIGHT 2

Contraphobic: wanting to do what scares you the most.

Pithy: having substance and point

Main Entry: sen.ten.tious
Pronunciation: sen-'ten(t)-sh&s
Middle English, full of meaning, from Latin sententiosus, from sententia sentence, maxim
Date: 1509
1 a : given to or abounding in aphoristic expression b : given to or abounding in excessive moralizing
2 : terse, aphoristic, or moralistic in expression : PITHY, EPIGRAMMATIC

I look forward to it with glee and mirth.

Hells, bells and buckets of blood.

We are all reclining at Belshazzar-s feast....

Main Entry: 1sna.fu
Pronunciation: sna-'f-, 'sna-"f-
Function: noun
Etymology: situation normal all fucked up (fouled up)
Date: circa 1941
: CONFUSION, MUDDLE

a creative solution was found for this snafu-

Main Entry: pussy.foot
Pronunciation: 'pu-sE-"fut
Function: intransitive verb
Date: 1903
1 : to tread or move warily or stealthily
2 : to refrain from committing oneself
- pussy.foot.er noun

The unspeakable in pursuit of the inedible. - Oscar Wilde on hunting.

Honta is bitch (lit.) in Yiddisch. From the German for dog (Hund)

Can open - worms everywhere.

Funster

Unlovely

In one fell swoop

Bay blue murder

Intemperate

Splenetic

Rock. Hard place. Me.

inchoate (in-KO-it) adjective

1. In an initial or early stage; incipient.

2. Imperfectly formed or developed.

[Latin inchoatus, past participle of inchoare, to begin, alteration of
incohare : in- + cohum, strap from yoke to harness.]

Kulturkampf (kool-TOOR-kahmpf) noun

1. The struggle (1871-1883) between the Roman Catholic Church and the
German government under Bismarck for control over school and
ecclesiastical appointments and civil marriage.

2. A conflict between secular and religious authorities.

[German : Kultur, + Kampf, struggle (from Middle High German kampf, from
Old High German kamph, probably ultimately from Latin campus, field).]

soporific (sop-uh-RIF-ik, so-puh-) adjective

1. Inducing or tending to induce sleep.

2. Drowsy.

noun

A drug or other substance that induces sleep; a hypnotic.

[From Latin sopor, a deep sleep.]

Main Entry: alac-ri-ty
Pronunciation: &-'la-kr&-tE
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin alacritas, from alacr-, alacer lively, eager
Date: 15th century
: promptness in response : cheerful readiness
with alacrity>
alac-ri-tous /-kr&-t&s/ adjective

Main Entry: ab.ste.mi.ous
Pronunciation: ab-'stE-mE-&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin abstemius, from abs- + -temius; akin to Latin temetum intoxicating drink
Date: 1609
: marked by restraint especially in the consumption of food or alcohol; also : reflecting such restrain

Main Entry: Pan.gloss.ian
Pronunciation: pan-'gl--sE-&n, pa[ng]-, -'glo-
Function: adjective
Etymology: Pangloss, optimistic tutor in Voltaire's Candide (1759)
Date: 1831
: marked by the view that all is for the best in this best of possible worlds : excessively optimistic

Main Entry: Man.i.chae.an
Function: noun
Etymology: Late Latin manichaeus, from Late Greek manichaios, from Manichaios Manes died ab 276 A.D. Persian founder of the sect
Date: 1556
Variant(s): or Man.i.che.an /"ma-n&-'kE-&n/; or Man.i.chee /'man-&-"kE/
1 : a believer in a syncretistic religious dualism originating in Persia in the 3d century A.D. and teaching the release of the spirit from matter through asceticism
2 : a believer in religious or philosophical dualism

Main Entry: 1bane
Pronunciation: 'bAn
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bana; akin to Old High German bano death
Date: before 12th century
1 a obsolete : KILLER, SLAYER b : POISON c : DEATH, DESTRUCTION d : WOE
2 : a source of harm or ruin : CURSE

Main Entry: at.a.vism
Pronunciation: 'a-t&-"vi-z&m
Function: noun
Etymology: French atavisme, from Latin atavus ancestor, from at- (probably akin to atta daddy) + avus grandfather -- more at UNCLE
Date: 1833
1 a : recurrence in an organism of a trait or character typical of an ancestral form and usually due to genetic recombination b : recurrence of or reversion to a past style, manner, outlook, or approach

Main Entry: 1hearse
Pronunciation: 'h&rs
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English herse, from Middle French herce harrow, frame for holding candles, from Latin hirpic-, hirpex harrow
Date: 14th century
1 a : an elaborate framework erected over a coffin or tomb to which memorial verses or epitaphs are attached b : a triangular candelabrum for 15 candles used especially at Tenebrae
2 a archaic : COFFIN b obsolete : BIER 2
3 : a vehicle for conveying the dead to the grave

Main Entry: av.a.tar
Pronunciation: 'a-v&-"t-r
Function: noun
Etymology: Sanskrit avatAra descent, from avatarati he descends, from ava- away + tarati he crosses over -- more at UKASE, THROUGH
Date: 1784
1 : the incarnation of a Hindu deity (as Vishnu)
2 a : an incarnation in human form b : an embodiment (as of a concept or philosophy) often in a person
3 : a variant phase or version of a continuing basic entity

Main Entry: com.punc.tion
Pronunciation: k&m-'p&[ng](k)-sh&n
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English compunccioun, from Middle French componction, from Late Latin compunction-, compunctio, from Latin compungere to prick hard, sting, from com- + pungere to prick -- more at PUNGENT
Date: 14th century
1 a : anxiety arising from awareness of guilt b : distress of mind over an anticipated action or result
2 : a twinge of misgiving : SCRUPLE
synonym see PENITENCE, QUALM
- com.punc.tious /-sh&s/ adjective

Main Entry: 2cordial
Function: noun
Date: 14th century
1 : a stimulating medicine or drink
2 : LIQUEUR

Main Entry: 1free.lance
Pronunciation: 'frE-"lan(t)s
Function: noun
Date: 1820
1 a usually free lance : a mercenary soldier especially of the Middle Ages : CONDOTTIERE b : a person who acts independently without being affiliated with or authorized by an organization
2 : a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer

Main Entry: alac.ri.ty
Pronunciation: &-'la-kr&-tE
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin alacritas, from alacr-, alacer lively, eager
Date: 15th century
: promptness in response : cheerful readiness
- alac.ri.tous /-kr&-t&s/ adjective

   

 
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